Learn To Love The Process

"Love the process and the grind more than the payoff"-Gary Vee


You may be thinking "this is a page about transitioning out of the military, why is he talking about Gary Vee?"


Well, that's because leaving the military is a process and in order to completely own it you need to think about it that way. First you take care of the starting three steps:

1-Commit to your decision (aka no plan-B)

2-Find Your Why

3-Network For Success (an ongoing part)


Then you're ready to dive deeper and refine your process. How does this look practically. I'll give you two scenarios.


Scenario 1:

You’ve decided on an industry where you want to work and you’ve narrowed it down to a

few top locations. You search all the job listings and send out slightly different versions of the same resume daily to hundreds of job postings. You try out LinkedIn to network, but immediately ask for favors or about job openings. You land a few interviews, but the only practice you've done is by yourself. You eventually land a job, but you're already looking for more.


Scenario 2:

Same industry and top locations as above. However, this time you research into the companies posting those jobs to see connections you may already have. You join existing veteran networks and seek out mentors. You use the experience of those with your background and ask for informal interviews. You use an interview prep service, like Candorful, or ask your mentors to do practice job interviews. You only apply to jobs through referrals from your growing network. When the interview comes, you feel more prepared. You land a great job and are able to focus more on everything else happening with your military transition.


Which one sounds better?


Which way did I start out? (I'll give you a hint, it wasn't the second way.)


Scenario 1 focused too much on the result, find a job. Scenario 2 focused more on the process and the job was the product of the process. This difference is often subtle, but important. So why does this matter?


If you don't treat your transition like a process you may find yourself in the first scenario and feeling behind. Your military transition starts well before you get out (ideally a year or more) and doesn't just end once you have your DD-214 blanket in hand.


The good news?


Millions of veterans have successfully done this before and thousands are going through this journey with you right now. Take control of your journey and become someone who loves the process, the results might surprise you.


What other topics besides job searching would you like to see covered by future posts and resources? Let me know in the comments below or email me.


Not sure where to start? Make sure to subscribe to our email list HERE.

Our Another Average Joe: Veteran Community launches April 30th!

Subscribers will be the first to know!

16 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All